home > archive > 2010 > this article


Search this site Search WWW

Some 'splainin' to do

By Lisa Fabrizio
web posted November 1, 2010

Hopefully, Wednesday morning all of conservative America--nearly half of the country according to pollsters--will be in the warm embrace of a sweet and luxurious electoral hangover; exhausted yet jubilant that they have not suffered the depredations of the last two years of liberal rule in vain. There is hardly a doubt that Republicans will regain much congressional territory; the only questions to be settled are how wide the margin and how lasting will be the results.

There are many, even on the right, who contend that a major ousting of liberals from the halls of power may not necessarily herald the dawning of a conservative resurgence; that voters are merely sick of the way that things are done in Washington, especially in times of financial distress. But what is this but a slight restatement of one of our major complaints? That this is precisely the cause of our financial predicament; the constant interference in the business of conducting business that has been the unconstitutional business of Congress for decades.

They say that it's only a case of anti-incumbency and the American people simply believe that a change of scenery is good every few years or so. This may indeed be the case, but there may never be a better time in history to disabuse them of that dangerous notion. We see where the mantra of 'change for change's sake' has gotten us.

This is a time of real decision for this country and the lines of demarcation have never been more pronounced than in the last two years. The incoming Republican congressmen have a duty to further delineate those differences and even more importantly, to make clear on what basis they will act; providing of course, they do.

And that will be the challenge facing us beginning a week from today. At the close of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, Benjamin Franklin was asked: "Well, Doctor, what have we got--a Republic or a Monarchy?" His famous reply, "A Republic, if you can keep it," should be a good watchword for those looking to capitalize and expand on the expected GOP victory. If we want a lasting return to our most cherished way of life, we've got to remind the public of exactly what that was, and how it worked.

This shouldn't be too hard considering the arrogance with which Obama and friends have conducted their assault on our liberties. From the plethora of extra constitutional czars to the sleazy backroom deals that produced the healthcare bill, they've managed to wake a sleeping giant. If any particular sound byte can be singled out as representative of people's outrage at Obamacare, it was Nancy Pelosi's statement that, "we have to pass it so we can find out what's in it." Americans can only take so much of this sort of treatment before they rebel against it, and a repurposed and rededicated GOP must be ready to step into the breach.

A good place to start would be a preemptive broadside against the charges of obstructionism that are sure to follow election day. They can explain that gridlock is not only desirable, but the express intent of the Founding Fathers; the reason they crafted our tried and true method of checks and balances. What is really needed here is a spokesman, someone who can reach the people in a common sense but unpreachy way; unlike Barack Obama, our lecturer-in-chief. This could be either an up-and-coming star or a beloved elder statesman; it is the message itself that is paramount.

Although much-maligned when released, the drafters of the "Contract from America" are on the right track in boiling down their agenda to a few, basic principals. Likewise, many were critical of the GOP's "Pledge to America" which was released last month, but the nation could do worse than heed its message: 

America is an idea, an idea that free people can govern themselves, that government's powers are derived from the consent of the governed, that each of us is endowed by their Creator with the unalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. America is the belief that any man or woman can--given economic, political, and religious liberty--advance themselves, their families, and the common good. America is an inspiration to those who yearn to be free and have the ability and the dignity to determine their own destiny. Whenever the agenda of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to institute a new governing agenda and set a different course.

Such are the words that can lead the country to a long and lasting relationship with the Republicans; provided they're sincere in their allegiance to them. But it won't be easy.

There are of course, still entrenched in the Party, certain limousine liberals who would gladly lead it leftward given the chance. No doubt aiding them every step of the way will be Minority Leader Pelosi and her minions who, ungracious in victory or defeat, will use every dirty trick in the book. But, as we have seen, the liberal media can only cover for them for so long until their motives are revealed and their plans ultimately defeated as they will hopefully be next week.

Unlike other mid-term routs, Republicans truly have a chance to make this victory a lasting one; provided they listen closely to the American people. They ought, as John Adams wrote to Thomas Jefferson, explain themselves to each other. ESR

Lisa Fabrizio is a columnist who hails from Connecticut. You may write her at mailbox@lisafab.com.

Send a link to this page!
Send a link to this story

 

Home


 

Home

Site Map

E-mail ESR

 

Send a link to this page!
Send a link to this story

 


Get weekly updates about new issues of ESR!

e-mail:
Subscribe
Unsubscribe

 

1996-2013, Enter Stage Right and/or its creators. All rights reserved.